America bids farewell to Trump, but Trumpism lives on

America bids farewell to Trump, but Trumpism lives on

After the storming of Capitol Hill, an avalanche of disapproval on all fronts may lead many to believe that Donald Trump will live out his days at Mar-a-Lago, Florida, with Trumpism buried once and for all. Nothing, however, could be further from the truth.

Trump secured over 74 million votes, the highest number for any president before him, regardless of any contextual niceties downplaying its significance. Not all of his supporters are extremists. Despite hellish blowback, he remains the most influential Republican in the party.

Notwithstanding the drama of a second impeachment, the ambivalence of many party heavyweights suggests that the GOP cannot afford to alienate a majority of Republican voters. According to a recent poll by Quinnipiac University, reported in The New York Times, 80 per cent of Republican voters say they do not hold Trump responsible for the rioting and 73 per cent think he is protecting democracy.

Trump’s popularity is no mere iconoclasm. By hook or by crook, he has managed to capture the zeitgeist of American politics – deep-seated frustrations and anger speaking to the heart and soul of the nation.