As Joe Biden faces a China emboldened in its race to tech supremacy, what policies will he pursue?

As Joe Biden faces a China emboldened in its race to tech supremacy, what policies will he pursue?

As the Biden administration takes the reins in Washington, the stakes have never been higher for the US relationship with China and the rest of Asia. In the fourth part of a post-US-election series, Jodi Xu Klein explores what tech policies Biden will he pursue as he faces an an emboldened China.

In January, the incoming US president Joe Biden and his administration will inherit a list of White House policies that they will have to untangle – perhaps even toss out – to develop a cohesive plan to meet the challenges of a more assertive China.

Chief among them is an emboldened China that has its sights set on attaining supremacy in future technologies. Four years of the Trump administration has taught Beijing the importance of self-reliance, as Huawei Technologies was cut off from its American supplier, and Chinese telecommunications companies were barred from the US market.

Under President Donald Trump, the Treasury Department has restricted Chinese investments in American companies; the Commerce Department’s “entity list” has barred Chinese companies from doing business in the US; the Defence Department has kept its own blacklist of companies that are believed to be linked to the Chinese military; and the State Department has started a “Clean Network” programme to exclude apps and carriers owned by Chinese firms.