Demoralised but defiant, Hong Kong’s spirit of resistance endures

Demoralised but defiant, Hong Kong’s spirit of resistance endures

  • Security law has largely stamped out anti-government protests, but the opposition is finding new ways to fight

Tony Chung spends his days in fear and solitude. For the 19-year-old activist, who became the first political figure to be arrested under Hong Kong’s national security law, the spectre of prison looms large.

Chung was arrested in late July with three other former members of the pro-independence group Studentlocalism – which he founded at the age of 15 – on suspicion of inciting secession under the law.

As he awaits his trial for another case – the desecration of the national flag – he is unable to sleep most nights. He is afraid to go out because he worries about his safety, having been followed by unidentified people on multiple occasions.

Amid the uncertainties over the impending trial, he cannot take up a place at university like most young people his age. He has nothing to read as most of his books were taken away by the police in a house search during his arrest. He cannot travel after the authorities confiscated his passport.