Donald Trump’s efforts to overturn the election’s results are failing

Donald Trump’s efforts to overturn the election’s results are failing

But do not expect them to stop

A FLUSH, IN poker, is a hand containing five cards of the same suit. It is a high hand; only a few others can beat it. A “four-flusher” refers to someone who claims to have a flush, when he has only four cards of the same suit, which is a nothing hand. A four-flusher is a braggart, a maker of empty promises—but most importantly he is someone easily caught doing those things. Since losing the presidential election, Donald Trump’s campaign has engaged in an orgy of four-flushing, making extravagant claims on television and minimal ones in court, where it needs to present actual evidence.

The Trump campaign’s post-election legal record is two wins, both minor, and 34 losses (by comparison, in 1988 the Baltimore Orioles had baseball’s worst-ever start; after 36 games they were 5-31). Last week ended with a federal judge in Pennsylvania dismissing the campaign’s request to throw out millions of legally cast ballots. The judge, whom the campaign derided as “Obama-appointed”, but who used to be a Republican official in the state and is a former member of the Federalist Society, an association of conservative lawyers, castigated the campaign’s “strained legal arguments without merit and speculative accusations…unsupported by evidence”. The campaign has filed an appeal, but its chances appear slim. Mr Trump’s quest to overturn the results is running up against states’ certification deadlines. He is running out of road, but still seems eager to keep driving.