The new Republican politicians keeping Trumpism alive

The new Republican politicians keeping Trumpism alive

Just one day after Joe Biden was sworn in as the 46th US president, Marjorie Taylor Greene, a newly elected Republican congresswoman from Georgia, filed articles of impeachment against him.

It was the kind of publicity stunt that Ms Greene, a supporter of far-right conspiracy QAnon, has become known for since she entered the political fray. Her ability to command the spotlight has made her a lodestar for loyalists to Donald Trump, who want to keep his aggressive brand of politics at the centre of the Republican party.

Ms Greene is one of a handful of new Republican lawmakers to have gained national attention thanks to media-savvy tactics. Others include Lauren Boebert, a Colorado gun rights activist who insisted she would bring a handgun to Capitol Hill despite local laws banning concealed weapons.

Like the former president, their real power lies in an ability to command the narrative, rather than notching up bona fide political victories. Even Ms Greene, who has taken to wearing a mask emblazoned with the word “censored”, seemed to acknowledge that her impeachment effort has little chance of success. “We’ll see how this goes,” she said in a video posted on Twitter.