Why Donald Trump seems to be in trouble in the Midwest this time around

Why Donald Trump seems to be in trouble in the Midwest this time around

The covid-19 pandemic, police violence and personal likeability are all strengthening Joe Biden in battleground states

CRAMMED TOGETHER by their thousands, those at Donald Trump’s night-time rally on October 24th at an airfield in Waukesha, near Milwaukee, roared in appreciation of his show. Never mind the pandemic, which is hitting the Midwest and its battleground states with ferocity in the closing stages of the campaign. The “China plague”, as he calls it, “It’s going away, it’s rounding the turn.” His fans in Wisconsin have frequent chances to see him. If Saturday’s event didn’t sate them, then they can attend another in West Salem, farther west, on Tuesday. That will be Mr Trump’s third rally in Wisconsin in less than two weeks. He might squeeze in another before polling day on November 3rd. Mr Trump believes in the rousing power of his rallies in closing a campaign.

On the day of his appearance in Waukesha he had already addressed similar events in North Carolina and Ohio. On Sunday he was in New Hampshire and Maine. In 2016 such end-of-campaign events fired up supporters in three Midwestern states—Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin—where his narrow victories delivered the electoral college, and the presidency, even though he had lost the popular vote. He relishes energising crowds, cracking jokes, dancing as speakers blast music and riffing away from any planned speech. Associated television coverage doesn’t hurt either.