Will the World Take the United States Seriously After the Capitol Invasion?

Will the World Take the United States Seriously After the Capitol Invasion?

After a pro-Trump mob stormed Congress, Americans might have a harder time accomplishing their diplomatic goals from Europe to China.

Emma Ashford: Hey, Matt. Here’s a fun fact that our readers might not know: We normally write this column on Wednesday mornings. And yet here we are, on Thursday, throwing out everything we wrote and starting over. I’m sure they can guess why. But I’m honestly struggling to find the words to sum up what happened on Wednesday afternoon this week. Coup? Insurrection? Riot?

Matthew Kroenig: It is not easy, but let me try to find the words. It was certainly a disgraceful and sad day in American history. FP’s Jonathan Tepperman had an interview with the expert Naunihal Singh that concluded that “sedition” was the best word for what took place.

EA: I guess in five years we can have a panel discussion of the American Political Science Association where we debate which precise term is best to describe it. Let’s be real, though: The fact we are even debating that question is horrifying. Rioters, some of them armed, stormed the seat of government. Five people are dead. America is certainly no stranger to political violence, even if much of it has been whitewashed out of history. But Jan. 6, 2021, is not going to be forgotten soon.